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Chondrocyte growth factor from the human pituitary gland.

Open AccessPublished:May 10, 1982DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0021-9258(18)34659-3
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      Extracts of frozen human pituitaries were mitogenic in a fetal rabbit chondrocyte bioassay. In the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, a 10-fold increase in chondrocyte cell number was observed upon addition of the pituitary factor to the culture medium. After gel filtration, the chondrocyte growth factor eluted with proteins of approximately 40,000 molecular weight. These fractions were pooled and purified further upon ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-cellulose. The most active fraction stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner down to 10 ng/ml. The chondrocyte growth factor was trypsin- and heat-sensitive (100 degrees C, 10-15 min). Its isoelectric point (pI 7.9) was different from bovine brain and pituitary fibroblast growth factor (pI 4.8-5.8 and pI 9.5, respectively. Unlike the somatomedins and epidermal growth factor, it was acid-labile. Preparations of human growth hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone, as well as vasopressin and oxytocin, were inactive in the bioassay, demonstrating that the human pituitary contains a chondrocyte growth factor which appears to be distinct from these anterior and posterior pituitary hormones.

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